AI Diagnoses Illness Based On the Sound of Your Voice

Voices offer lots of information. Turns out, they can even help diagnose an illness — and researchers are working on an app for that. The National Institutes of Health is funding a massive research project to collect voice data and develop an AI that could diagnose people based on their speech. Everything from your vocal cord vibrations to breathing patterns when you speak offers potential information about your health, says laryngologist Dr. Yael Bensoussan, the director of the University of South Florida’s Health Voice Center and a leader on the study.

We asked experts: Well, if you close your eyes when a patient comes in, just by listening to their voice, can you have an idea of the diagnosis they have?” Bensoussan says. “And that’s where we got all our information.”

Someone who speaks low and slowly might have Parkinson’s disease. Slurring is a sign of a stroke. Scientists could even diagnose depression or cancer. The team will start by collecting the voices of people with conditions in five areas: neurological disorders, voice disorders, mood disorders, respiratory disorders and pediatric disorders like autism and speech delays. The project is part of the NIH‘s Bridge to AI program, which launched over a year ago with more than $100 million in funding from the federal government, with the goal of creating large-scale health care databases for precision medicine.

We were really lacking large what we call open source databases,” Bensoussan says. “Every institution kind of has their own database of data. But to create these networks and these infrastructures was really important to then allow researchers from other generations to use this data.” This isn’t the first time researchers have used AI to study human voices, but it’s the first time data will be collected on this level — the project is a collaboration between USF, Cornell and 10 other institutions. “We saw that everybody was kind of doing very similar work but always at a smaller level,” Bensoussan says. “We needed to do something as a team and build a network.”

The ultimate goal is an app that could help bridge access to rural or underserved communities, by helping general practitioners refer patients to specialists. Long term, iPhones or Alexa could detect changes in your voice, such as a cough, and advise you to seek medical attention.

Source: https://www.npr.org/

Covid Voice Detector

Record your voice to help save lives!

Carnegie Mellon University, voca.ai, telling.ai, hat-ai.com and Incremental Healthcare LLC collaboratively bring you this experimental system designed to detect signatures of Covid-19 infections in your voice. This is a free service.​

The team of voice scientists and engineers are working on voice forensic technologies. The Covid-19 pandemic is spreading rapidly across the world. There is a growing shortage of medical testing facilities. Tens of thousands of potentially infected people who need to be tested do not have easy access to medical tests. The goal is to develop a voice-based testing system for Covid-19, that could potentially reach every person in the world.​

A website provides Covid-19 assessment from voice. You may try it out, but please see the disclaimer. To make this system accurate, the research team urgently need examples of voices from healthy and infected people. Please use this system to donate your voice. Please ask your friends family to also do so. Together we may help save lives.​

What this system currently provides: This is an AI-powered system that analyzes your voice and gives you a score. The score is a rating on a scale of 1-10 that tells you the likelihood that your voice carries signatures of Covid-19. The higher the returned rating, the greater the likelihood that you may be infected. In addition, the system provides an assessment of your lung capacity where possible. ​

Please remember that this system is still very much under development. It will improve as the scientists obtain more data from healthy and infected individuals. Everyone is urged to contribute data, particularly if you are or have been infected. Please act responsibly and provide accurate information. The accuracy of the data we obtain will dictate our ability to succeed.

Source; https://cvd.lti.cmu.edu/

Want to Sound Like Barack Obama?

For your hair, there are wigs and hairstylists; for your skin, there are permanent and removable tattoos; for your eyes, there are contact lenses that disguise the shape of your pupils. In short, there’s a plethora of tools people can use if they want to give themselves a makeover—except for one of their signature features: their voice.

Sure a Darth Vader voice changing mask would do something about it, but for people who want to sound like a celebrity or a person of the opposite sex, look no further than Boston-based startup Modulate.

CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENJOY THE VIDEO

Founded in August 2017 by two MIT grads, this self-funded startup is using machine learning to change your voice as you speak. This could be a celebrity’s voice (like Barack Obama’s), the voice of a game character or even a totally custom voice. With potential applications in the gaming and movie industries, Modulate has launched  with a free online demo that allows users to play with the service.

The cool thing about Modulate is that the software doesn’t simply disguise your voice, but it does something far more radical: it converts a person’s speech into somebody’s else vocal chords, changing the very I.D. of someone’s speech but keeping intact cadence and word choice. As a result, you sound like you, but have in fact someone’s else voice.

Source: https://www.americaninno.com/