No More Glasses for Blurry Vision

New eye drops can limit the use for reading glassesVuity has just been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and local ophthalmologists say it can be a life-changerThe drops are meant for people dealing with Presbyopia, an age-related eye issue that causes blurry vision

We all know the reading glasses are annoying,” said Dr. Ella Faktorovich, an ophthalmologist with Pacific Vision Institute. “Within 15 minutes you can see your computer, you can see your phone so you can really improve the range of vision. I think it is huge.” She says the drops target the focusing mechanism in the eye. The drops shrink the pupils and increase focus on theeye.

There are many kinds of this medicine in trials, but this is the first to be approved,” she said. “It is pretty remarkable.” It can help people like Lovester Law, who is currently writing a book. He says he spends hours looking at a screen to write“After I read too much or write to long, I just have to close my eyes and relax,” he explained.

“If we live long enough our eyes are going to age, they are not going to be like they used to be.” People who want the drops will have to consult an eye doctor, because they are only available through a prescription. Doctors at UCSF say this breakthrough can be a catalyst for future eye treatment. The data we have shows that it really really works,” stated Julie Schallhorn, Associate Professor of ophthalmology at UCSF. “It is an exciting time to be in this field, and an exciting time for our patients.

The FDA approval of VUITY was based on data from two pivotal phase 3 clinical studies, GEMINI 1 and GEMINI 2, which evaluated the efficacy, safety and tolerability of VUITY for the treatment of presbyopia.

Source: https://news.abbvie.com/

Biosynthetic Cornea Implant Restores Vision

A cornea implant made out of collagen gathered from pig skin has restored the vision of 20 volunteers in a landmark pilot study. Pending further testing, the novel bioengineered implant is hoped to improve the vision of millions around the world awaiting difficult and costly cornea transplant surgeries. More than one million people worldwide are diagnosed blind every year due to damaged or diseased corneas. A person’s vision can be easily disrupted when this thin outer layer of tissue surrounding the eye degenerates. A person suffering corneal blindness can have their vision restored by receiving a corneal transplant from a human donor. However, a lack of cornea donors means barely one in 70 people with corneal blindness will ever be able to access a transplant. Plus, the surgical procedure can be complex, amplifying the lack of access to this vision-restoring procedure for people in low– and middle-income countries.

This new research first looked to develop cornea implants that didn’t rely on human donor tissue. Over a decade ago the researchers first demonstrated biosynthetic corneas were effective replacements for donor corneas. But those earlier studies still relied on complex lab-grown human collagen, molded into the shape of corneas. This new study demonstrates the same biosynthetic cornea can be effectively produced using medical-grade collagen sourced from pig skin. Not only is this a cheap and sustainable source of collagen, but improved engineering techniques mean these bioengineered corneas can be safely stored for almost two years, unlike donated human corneas which must be used within two weeks of harvesting.

A pilot study saw bioengineered implants restore the vision of 14 volunteers who were completely blind before the experimental procedure

The results show that it is possible to develop a biomaterial that meets all the criteria for being used as human implants, which can be mass-produced and stored up to two years and thereby reach even more people with vision problems,” explained Neil Lagali, one of the researchers working on the project. “This gets us around the problem of shortage of donated corneal tissue and access to other treatments for eye diseases.

The other innovation demonstrated in the study is a new surgical approach for implanting the bioengineered cornea. Instead of needing to surgically remove a patient’s pre-existing cornea, as would be done when transplanting a donor cornea, the new method leaves that tissue intact. Only a small suture is necessary to insert the novel implant.

The new study, published in Nature Biotechnology, describes the results of a pilot trial that tested the implant in 20 volunteers, 14 of whom were completely blind before the experimental procedure. At the two-year follow-up the study reports all 20 volunteers had completely regained their vision and experienced no adverse effects from the surgery.

Source: https://newatlas.com/

Nanotubes In the Eye That Help Us See

Researchers  find a new structure by which cells in the retina communicate with each other, regulating blood supply to keep vision intact. A new mechanism of blood redistribution that is essential for the proper functioning of the adult retina has just been discovered in vivo by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM).

For the first time, we have identified a communication structure between cells that is required to coordinate blood supply in the living retina,” said Dr. Adriana Di Polo, a neuroscience professor at Université de Montréal and holder of a Canada Research Chair in glaucoma and age-related neurodegeneration, who supervised the study.

We already knew that activated retinal areas receive more blood than non-activated ones,” she said, “but until now no one understood how this essential blood delivery was finely regulated.”

The study was conducted on mice by two members of Di Polo’s lab: Dr. Luis Alarcon-Martinez, a postdoctoral fellow, and Deborah Villafranca-Baughman, a PhD student. Both are the first co-authors of this study.

In living animals, as in humans, the retina uses the oxygen and nutrients contained in the blood to fully function. This vital exchange takes place through capillaries, the thinnest blood vessels in all organs of the body. When the blood supply is dramatically reduced or cut off—such as in ischemia or stroke—the retina does not receive the oxygen it needs. In this condition, the cells begin to die and the retina stops working as it should.

The study has been published in Nature.

https://www.chumontreal.qc.ca/