Tag Archives: vaccine

What Is Regeneron, The Antibody Cocktail Used To Cure Trump?

A descriptive analysis of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals‘ Phase I/II/III clinical trial has found that its antibody cocktail REGN-COV2 lowered viral load and the time to symptoms improvement in non-hospitalised Covid-19 patients. The therapy also demonstrated positive trends in decreasing medical visits. During the ongoing, randomised, double-blind trial, the combination of REGN-COV2 and usual standard-of-care is being compared to placebo plus standard-of-care.

Regeneron noted that trial participants were given a one-time infusion of 8g or 2.4g of REGN-COV2 or placeboData from the descriptive analysis is based on the findings from the initial 275 patients. The analysis evaluated anti-viral activity with the therapy and is intended to detect patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment. Safety analysis revealed that both doses of the therapy were well-tolerated, with infusion reactions found in four patients.

The greatest treatment benefit was in patients who had not mounted their own effective immune response, suggesting that REGN-COV2 could provide a therapeutic substitute for the naturally-occurring immune response, ” said Regeneron Pharmaceuticals president and chief scientific officer George Yancopoulos. “We are highly encouraged by the robust and consistent nature of these initial data, as well as the emerging well-tolerated safety profile, and we have begun discussing our findings with regulatory authorities while continuing our ongoing trials.

This trial is part of a clinical programme, which includes studies of REGN-COV2 to treat hospitalised patients and to prevent infection in people exposed to Covid-19 patients. More than 2,000 subjects have been recruited across the overall REGN-COV2 development programme. At least 1,300 participants will be part of the Phase II/III portion of the outpatient trial overall. In July, Regeneron launched Phase III trials of REGN-COV2 for the treatment and prevention of Covid-19.

Source: https://www.clinicaltrialsarena.com/

Coronavirus Vaccine: When Will We Have One?

There are around 40 different coronavirus vaccines in clinical trials – including one being developed by the University of Oxford that is already in an advanced stage of testing. The virus spreads easily, and the majority of the world’s population is still vulnerable to it. A vaccine would provide some protection by training people’s immune systems to fight the virus so they should not become sick. This would allow lockdowns to be lifted more safely, and social distancing to be relaxed.

Research is happening at breakneck speed. About 240 vaccines are in early development, with 40 in clinical trials and nine already in the final stage of testing on thousands of peopleTrials of the Oxford vaccine show it can trigger an immune response, and a deal has been signed with AstraZeneca to supply 100 million doses in the UK alone. The first human trial data back in May indicated the first eight patients taking part in a US study all produced antibodies that could neutralise the virus. A group in China showed a vaccine was safe and led to protective antibodies being made. It is being made available to the Chinese military.

Other completely new approaches to vaccine development are in human trials. However, no-one knows how effective any of these vaccines will be. A vaccine would normally take years, if not decades, to develop. Researchers hope to achieve the same amount of work in only a few months. Most experts think a vaccine is likely to become widely available by mid-2021, about 12-18 months after the new virus, known officially as Sars-CoV-2, first emerged. That would be a huge scientific feat, and there are no guarantees it will work. But scientists are optimistic that, if trials are successful, then a small number of people – such as healthcare workers – may be vaccinated before the end of this year. It is worth noting that four coronaviruses already circulate in human beings. They cause common cold symptoms and we don’t have vaccines for any of them.

https://www.bbc.com/

China confirms Its First COVID-19 Vaccine Patent

China, ground zero of the novel coronavirus outbreak, confirmed its first COVID-19 vaccine patent Sunday, according to state-affiliated media. “China has approved its first COVID19 vaccine patent, which has been developed by PLA infectious disease expert Chen Wei’s team. Earlier, the phase 2 trial of the vaccine candidate found that the vaccine is safe and induces an immune response, China Global Television Network (CGTN) said on Twitter. Citing data from clinical trials published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), China’s state-run Xinhua News Agency reported earlier in the day that the COVID-19 vaccine candidate is “safe and generates an immune response.”

 The COVID-19 vaccine candidate is “safe and generates an immune response,” reported China’s state-run Xinhua News Agency.

The research involved 320healthy volunteers” aged between 18 and 59, of which 96 participated in phase-1 clinical trials and 224 in phase-2 trials, it said. Xinhua said the results indicated that the vaccine effectively induced neutralizing antibodies in the volunteers and demonstrated good ability of a substance to trigger an immune response. On Saturday, Russia’s Health Ministry announced that the country has started production of its first COVID-19 vaccine, noting initial batches will be earmarked for immunizing doctors and health workers before going to the general public. Russia officially registered the world’s first coronavirus vaccine, developed by the Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, on Tuesday.

Source: https://jamanetwork.com/
AND
https://fr.reuters.com/

Coronavirus: Sputnik-V Vaccine Has Been Approved For Use

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said a locally developed vaccine for Covid-19 has been given regulatory approval after less than two months of testing on humans. Mr Putin said the vaccine had passed all the required checks, adding that his daughter had already been given it. Officials have said they plan to start mass vaccination in October.

Experts have raised concerns about the speed of Russia‘s work, suggesting that researchers might be cutting corners. Amid fears that safety could have been compromised, the World Health Organization (WHO) urged Russia last week to follow international guidelines for producing a vaccine against Covid-19. On Tuesday, the WHO said it had been in talks with Russian authorities about undertaking a review of the vaccine, which has been named Sputnik-V.

https://www.bbc.com/

Coronavirus Vaccine: When?

Researchers around the world are developing more than 165 vaccines against the coronavirus, and 27 vaccines are in human trials. Vaccines typically require years of research and testing before reaching the clinic, but scientists are racing to produce a safe and  effective vaccine by next year. But it is likeky that before the end of the summer we will know if one vaccine, at least, is efficient.

Work began in January with the deciphering of the genome. The first vaccine safety trials in humans started in March, but the road ahead remains uncertain. Some trials will fail, and others may end without a clear result. But a few may succeed in stimulating the immune system to produce effective antibodies against the virus.

Check the status of all the vaccines that have reached trials in humans, along with a selection of promising vaccines still being tested in cells or animals.

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/

First data for Moderna Covid-19 vaccine show it spurs an immune response

Moderna’s Covid-19 vaccine led patients to produce antibodies that can neutralize the novel coronavirus that causes the disease, though it caused minor side effects in many patients, according to the first published data from an early-stage trial of the experimental shot.


It certainly is a good beginning,” said Betty Diamond, director at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research.

The results were published Tuesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. Moderna had previously released some results in a press release, but many experts said they were not sufficient to draw many conclusions. Even now, many are withholding judgment. The study, which was run by the National Institutes of Health, showed that volunteers who received the vaccine made more neutralizing antibodies than have been seen in most patients who have recovered from Covid-19. But a second injection, four weeks after the first, was required before the vaccine produced a dramatic immune response.

https://www.statnews.com/

Coronavirus could ‘burn out naturally’

Coronavirus could “burn out naturally” so a vaccine is no longer needed, a former World Health Organisation director has claimed, as the British Government announces it is dedicating more than £90m to a dedicated inoculation development centre.

Professor Karol Sikora, an oncologist and chief medical officer at Rutherford Health, said it is likely the British public has more immunity than previously thought and Covid-19 could end up “petering out by itself”.

There is a real chance that the virus will burn out naturally before any vaccine is developed,” he wrote on his social media profile yesterday. “We are seeing a roughly similar pattern everywhere – I suspect we have more immunity than estimated. We need to keep slowing the virus, but it could be petering out by itself.

Source: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/

Sweden Could Reach ‘Herd Immunity’ In Weeks

In an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus outbreak, many countries imposed lockdown restrictions on public life, prompting the closure of schools, restaurants and businesses deemed non essential. But Sweden did something different. Instead of imposing strict social-distancing policies like most of the world, Sweden aimed at keeping public life as open as possible, allowing for some exposure to the virus to build immunity among its population. Sweden rolled out voluntary measures, advising older people and others particularly vulnerable to the virus to avoid social contact. It also recommended people work from home, wash their hands regularly and avoid nonessential travel. But the country’s borders stayed open, along with some schools and many businesses.

Herd immunity could be reached in Stockholm in the coming weeks. In major parts of Sweden, around Stockholm, we have reached a plateau [in new cases] and we’re already seeing the effect of herd immunity, and in a few weeks’ time we’ll see even more of the effects of that. And in the rest of the country, the situation is stable,” says Dr. Anders Tegnell, chief epidemiologist at Sweden’s Public Health AgencyHerd immunity is when a high proportion of the population is immune to an infection, and usually occurs with a vaccine. There’s currently no vaccine for the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, and scientists are investigating whether exposure and recovery from the coronavirus leads to long-term immunity.

Tegnell said data indicate 20 percent of Stockholm’s population is already immune to the virus, and that “in a few weeks’ time we might reach her immunity and we believe that is why we’re seeing a slow decline in cases, in spite of sampling [testing for the coronavirus] more and more.” “Unfortunately the mortality rate is high due to the introduction in elderly care homes and we are investigating the cause of that,” Tegnell explained. The country, with a population of roughly 10 million, has more than 16,000 confirmed cases, most in Stockholm and surrounding areas. The number of cases in Sweden is nearly double that of Denmark and Finland, which have put lockdown measures in place. Both Denmark and Finland have populations about half of Sweden’s. Sweden has recorded more than 1,900 deaths.

Sweden’s strategy has stirred some controversy, as some health experts have criticized the approach. Some even liken it to playing Russian roulette with public health, CNBC reports. More than 20 high-profile scientists last week wrote in a Swedish newspaper that public-health authorities had failed, and urged politicians to step in with stricter measures, according to Nature. “Closing borders, in my opinion, is ridiculous,” Tegnell told Nature. “Because COVID-19 is in every European country now. We have more concerns about movements inside Sweden. As a society, we are more into nudging: continuously reminding people to use measures, improving measures where we see day by day that they need to be adjusted. We do not need to close down everything completely because it would be counterproductive.”

Source: https://thehill.com/

New Experimental Vaccine

An experimental coronavirus vaccine developed by Oxford University has protected six monkeys from “heavy quantities” of the pathogen — a promising breakthrough in the worldwide race for a cure.

Researchers at the National Institute of Health Rocky Mountain Laboratory injected the six rhesus macaque monkeys with the Oxford concoction, then exposed them to “heavy quantities” of COVID-19 — exposure that had consistently sickened other monkeys in the lab, the New York Times reported Monday.

But 28 days later, all the chimps were still healthy. After a Swiss team has declared the entire population of Switzerland could get a Covid-19 jab by october, and  a new Chinese vaccine that prevents all monkeys heavily infected to get the disease, it is the 3rd hope given to the world in one week for a better future.

Source: http://www.ox.ac.uk/
AND
https://www.sciencesgate.com/
AND
https://www.sciencesgate.com/

New COVID-19 Vaccine Shows Promise

An experimental COVID-19 vaccine protected monkeys from catching the viral infection, according to an unreviewed report. The new vaccine has now entered clinical trials in China to test the drug in humans.

Although the animal study, posted April 19 to the preprint database bioRxiv, has not been subject to formal review, scientists took to Twitter to share their first impressions.

So, this is the first ‘serious’ preclinical data I have seen for an actual vaccine candidate,” Florian Krammer, a professor in the Department of Microbiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, tweeted on April 22. Before being tested in healthy humans, vaccines undergo so-called preclinical tests in animals. The experimental vaccine, developed by the Beijing-based company Sinovac Biotech, showed promising results in rhesus macaques before entering human trials, Krammer noted.  “I’m a fan,” he added in another tweet.

Now in clinical trials, various doses of the vaccine will be given to 144 individuals to determine whether it’s safe, meaning it does not cause dangerous side effects, according to ClinicalTrials.gov. The vaccine would then move into efficacy trials with more than 1,000 additional people to determine whether it triggers an adequate immune response, commented Meng Weining, Sinovac’s senior director for overseas regulatory affairs.

The Sinovac vaccine contains an inactivated version of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. By introducing an inactive virus into the body, the vaccine should prompt the immune system to build antibodies that target the pathogen without triggering an actual COVID-19 infection. When given to mice, rats and rhesus macaques, the vaccine sparked the production of such antibodies, according to the bioRxiv report. “This is old-fashioned technology,” which would make the product easy to manufacture, Krammer wrote on Twitter. “What I like most is that many vaccine producers, also in lower–middle-income countries, could make such a vaccine,” he added in an interview

Source: http://www.sinovac.com/
AND
https://www.livescience.com/