Natural Killer Cells, Primed with an Antibody, Induce Remissions in Patients with Advanced Lymphoma

Two patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma were told their tumors were
so resistant to treatment that hospice was their best option. Then, they were
enrolled in a clinical trial of a novel immunotherapy involving so-called
natural killer cells. After treatment, they saw complete remission.
Researchers say the results are a hopeful if preliminary sign of the potential of immunotherapies harnessing natural killer, or NK, cellsinnate immune system cells that have certain advantages over the more commonly recognized adaptive T cell cancer therapies.
The treatment in the study, developed by the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the German drug maker Affimed, combined offthe-shelf NK cells with a separate antibody that primes the cells to recognize a specific protein signature of the tumors. Two additional patients administered
the same treatment have shown ongoing partial responses.

These results show you just how powerful NK cells are,” said Katy Rezvani,
a stem-cell transplant physician and NK cell researcher at MD Anderson, who
is spearheading the development of this new treatment.
It’s amazing when you see these responses for patients who have so few
options, patients who’ve been told that they should go to hospice,” Rezvani
said.“I cannot begin to tell you how satisfying this is for clinicians.
Data from the study is to be presented at the annual meeting of the American
Association for Cancer Research (AACR).
Source: https://www.mdanderson.org/
AND
https://www.mskcc.org/

How To Turn Tumors Into Cancer Vaccine Factories

Researchers at Mount Sinai have developed last year a novel approach to cancer immunotherapy, injecting immune stimulants directly into a tumor to teach the immune system to destroy it and other tumor cells throughout the body.
The “in situ vaccination” worked so well in patients with advanced-stage lymphoma that it is also undergoing trials in breast and head and neck cancer patients, according to a study published in Nature Medicine in April.
The treatment consists of administering a series of immune stimulants directly into one tumor site. The first stimulant recruits important immune cells called dendritic cells that act like generals of the immune army. The second stimulant activates the dendritic cells, which then instruct T cells, the immune system’s soldiers, to kill cancer cells and spare non-cancer cells. This immune army learns to recognize features of the tumor cells so it can seek them out and destroy them throughout the body, essentially turning the tumor into a cancer vaccine factory.

The in situ vaccine approach has broad implications for multiple types of cancer,” said lead author Joshua Brody, MD, Director of the Lymphoma Immunotherapy Program at The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “This method could also increase the success of other immunotherapies such as checkpoint blockade.”

After testing the lymphoma vaccine in the lab, it was tested in 11 patients in a clinical trial. Some patients had full remission from months to years. In lab tests in mice, the vaccine drastically increased the success of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy, the type of immunotherapy responsible for the complete remission of former President Jimmy Carter’s cancer and the focus of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Medicine.

Source: https://www.mountsinai.org/