Half of Israel’s Population Will Be Vaccinated by the End of the Month

Israel‘s Health Minister Edelstein provided ministry data showing that 2,272,000 people have so far had the first of the two-shot Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, including 550,000 who have also had their second dose. The number represents close to a quarter of Israel’s 9.3 million citizens and maintains its position as the country with the highest per capita vaccination rate in the world, according to monitoring groups.

Edelstein on Wednesday presented figures showing that over 210,000 vaccination shots were administered the day before, a new record for the country’s mass inoculation program.

Israelis recieve a Covid-19 vaccine, at a vaccination center operated by the Tel Aviv Municipality

Urging continued adherence to Health Ministry lockdown guidelines, which on Tuesday were extended until January 31, Edelstein wrote “a little more and this will be behind us.

His figures were more optimistic than numbers released by the ministry during the morning, which showed that 56,008 people had their first dose on Tuesday and another 114,769 had the second shot for a total of 170,777. It was not clear why there was a discrepancy in the numbers.

The ministry said 8,511 new cases were confirmed Tuesday, a drop of some 1,500 from the record-shattering 10,058 cases detected on Monday. The figure for Tuesday was the lowest weekday daily caseload in over a week. The positive test rate also dropped to 9.2%, having reached 10.2% on Monday.

Source: https://www.timesofisrael.com/

Sweden Could Reach ‘Herd Immunity’ In Weeks

In an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus outbreak, many countries imposed lockdown restrictions on public life, prompting the closure of schools, restaurants and businesses deemed non essential. But Sweden did something different. Instead of imposing strict social-distancing policies like most of the world, Sweden aimed at keeping public life as open as possible, allowing for some exposure to the virus to build immunity among its population. Sweden rolled out voluntary measures, advising older people and others particularly vulnerable to the virus to avoid social contact. It also recommended people work from home, wash their hands regularly and avoid nonessential travel. But the country’s borders stayed open, along with some schools and many businesses.

Herd immunity could be reached in Stockholm in the coming weeks. In major parts of Sweden, around Stockholm, we have reached a plateau [in new cases] and we’re already seeing the effect of herd immunity, and in a few weeks’ time we’ll see even more of the effects of that. And in the rest of the country, the situation is stable,” says Dr. Anders Tegnell, chief epidemiologist at Sweden’s Public Health AgencyHerd immunity is when a high proportion of the population is immune to an infection, and usually occurs with a vaccine. There’s currently no vaccine for the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, and scientists are investigating whether exposure and recovery from the coronavirus leads to long-term immunity.

Tegnell said data indicate 20 percent of Stockholm’s population is already immune to the virus, and that “in a few weeks’ time we might reach her immunity and we believe that is why we’re seeing a slow decline in cases, in spite of sampling [testing for the coronavirus] more and more.” “Unfortunately the mortality rate is high due to the introduction in elderly care homes and we are investigating the cause of that,” Tegnell explained. The country, with a population of roughly 10 million, has more than 16,000 confirmed cases, most in Stockholm and surrounding areas. The number of cases in Sweden is nearly double that of Denmark and Finland, which have put lockdown measures in place. Both Denmark and Finland have populations about half of Sweden’s. Sweden has recorded more than 1,900 deaths.

Sweden’s strategy has stirred some controversy, as some health experts have criticized the approach. Some even liken it to playing Russian roulette with public health, CNBC reports. More than 20 high-profile scientists last week wrote in a Swedish newspaper that public-health authorities had failed, and urged politicians to step in with stricter measures, according to Nature. “Closing borders, in my opinion, is ridiculous,” Tegnell told Nature. “Because COVID-19 is in every European country now. We have more concerns about movements inside Sweden. As a society, we are more into nudging: continuously reminding people to use measures, improving measures where we see day by day that they need to be adjusted. We do not need to close down everything completely because it would be counterproductive.”

Source: https://thehill.com/