Beams of Light Restore Hearing

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Germany has developed a cochlear implant that converts sound waves to light signals instead of electrical signals. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the group describes their new hearing aid and how well it worked in test rats.

Cochlear implants work by converting  into  that are sent to nerve cells in the ear. The idea is to bypass damaged hair cells inside the cochlea to restore hearing. But because the fluid in the ear also conducts electricity, the electrical signals that are generated can cross, leading to a loss of resolution. The result is difficulty hearing in some situations, such as crowded rooms, or when listening to music with a lot of instruments. In this new effort, the researchers sought to replace the electrical signals in such devices with , which would not be muddied by the fluid in the ear, and thereby improve hearing.

In all types of cochlear devices, sound entering the ear is directed to a computer chip that processes the sound it detects. After processing, the chip directs another device to create signals that are sent to the neurons. With the new device, the researchers developed a device that would generate light using LED chips and send it through fiber cable directly to the nerve cells.

In order for such a system to work, the nerve cells inside the ear would have to be modified in some way to allow them to respond to light instead of electricity. For testing purposes, the researchers genetically modified lab rats to grow  in their  that would respond to light. In their device, they used an implant with 10 LED chips. They also trained the rats to respond to different sounds before disabling their hair cells and implanting the cochlear devices. The implants worked as hoped, as the rats were able to respond in similar ways to the same generated sounds.

The researchers suggest that in people, such a device would use 64 LED or other light source channels. They also plan to conduct more research with the device and hope to start clinical trials by 2025.

Source: https://medicalxpress.com/

Flexible device could treat hearing loss without batteries

Some people are born with hearing loss, while others acquire it with age, infections or long-term noise exposures. In many instances, the tiny hairs in the inner ear’s cochlea that allow the brain to recognize electrical pulses as sound are damaged. As a step toward an advanced artificial cochlea, researchers in ACS Nano report a conductive membrane, which translated sound waves into matching electrical signals when implanted inside a model ear, without requiring external power.

An electrically conductive membrane implanted inside a model ear simulates cochlear hairs by converting sound waves into electrical pulses; wiring connects the prototype to a device that collects the output current signal.

When the hair cells inside the inner ear stop working, there’s no way to reverse the damage. Currently, treatment is limited to hearing aids or cochlear implants. But these devices require external power sources and can have difficulty amplifying speech correctly so that it’s understood by the user. One possible solution is to simulate healthy cochlear hairs, converting noise into the electrical signals processed by the brain as recognizable sounds. To accomplish this, previous researchers have tried self-powered piezoelectric materials, which become charged when they’re compressed by the pressure that accompanies sound waves, and triboelectric materials, which produce friction and static electricity when moved by these waves. However, the devices aren’t easy to make and don’t produce enough signal across the frequencies involved in human speech. So, Yunming Wang and colleagues from the University of Wuhan wanted a simple way to fabricate a material that used both compression and friction for an acoustic sensing device with high efficiency and sensitivity across a broad range of audio frequencies.

To create a piezo-triboelectric material, the researchers mixed barium titanate nanoparticles coated with silicon dioxide into a conductive polymer, which they dried into a thin, flexible film. Next, they removed the silicon dioxide shells with an alkaline solution. This step left behind a sponge-like membrane with spaces around the nanoparticles, allowing them to jostle around when hit by sound waves. In tests, the researchers showed that contact between the nanoparticles and polymer increased the membrane’s electrical output by 55% compared to the pristine polymer. When they sandwiched the membrane between two thin metal grids, the acoustic sensing device produced a maximum electrical signal at 170 hertz, a frequency within the range of most adult’s voices. Finally, the researchers implanted the device inside a model ear and played a music file. They recorded the electrical output and converted it into a new audio file, which displayed a strong similarity to the original version. The researchers say their self-powered device is sensitive to the wide acoustic range needed to hear most sounds and voices.

Source: https://www.acs.org/
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https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/