Johnson & Johnson One-Shot Coronavirus Vaccine Approved in the U.S.

A Centers for Disease Control advisory panel on Sunday recommended Johnson & Johnson’s one-shot COVID-19 vaccine for people 18 and over, clearing the way for inoculations to begin as soon as this week. The recommendation comes one day after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Saturday authorized Johnson & Johnson‘s COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use.

The authorization of this vaccine expands the availability of vaccines, the best medical prevention method for COVID-19, to help us in the fight against this pandemic, which has claimed over half a million lives in the United States,” Acting FDA Commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock said Saturday.

The FDA, through our open and transparent scientific review process, has now authorized three COVID-19 vaccines with the urgency called for during this pandemic, using the agency’s rigorous standards for safety, effectiveness and manufacturing quality needed to support emergency use authorization.”

The vaccine is the third to be approved for use in the U.S., and the first that requires only one shot. The FDA‘s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) voted unanimously to recommend authorizing the vaccine by Janssen, a division of Johnson & Johnson, on Friday. The committee provides expert advice to the FDA, but does not have final say on approval.

https://www.cbsnews.com/

AI Detects Visual Signs Of Covid-19

Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University in Wuhan, China, is at the heart of the outbreak of Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 that has shut down cities in China, South Korea, Iran, and Italy. That’s forced the hospital to become a testbed for how quickly a modern medical center can adapt to a new infectious disease epidemic.

One experiment is underway in Zhongnan’s radiology department, where staff are using artificial intelligence software to detect visual signs of the pneumonia associated with Covid-19 on lung CT scan images. Haibo Xu, professor and chair of radiology at Zhongnan Hospital, says the software helps overworked staff screen patients and prioritize those most likely to have Covid-19 for further examination and testing 

Detecting pneumonia on a scan doesn’t alone confirm a person has the disease, but Xu says doing so helps staff diagnose, isolate, and treat patients more quickly. The software “can identify typical signs or partial signs of Covid-19 pneumonia,” he wrotel. Doctors can then follow up with other examinations and lab tests to confirm a diagnosis of the disease. Xu says his department was quickly overwhelmed as the virus spread through Wuhan in January.

The software in use at Zhongnan was created by Beijing startup Infervision, which says  its Covid-19 tool has been deployed at 34 hospitals in China and used to review more than 32,000 cases. The startup, founded in 2015 with funding from investors including early Google backer Sequoia Capital, is an example of how China has embraced applying artificial intelligence to medicine.

China’s government has urged development of AI tools for healthcare as part of sweeping national investments in artificial intelligence. China’s relatively lax rules on privacy allow companies such as Infervision to gather medical data to train machine learning algorithms in tasks like reading scans more easily than US or European rivals.

Infervision created its main product, software that flags possible lung problems on CT scans, using hundreds of thousands of lung images collected from major Chinese hospitals. The software is in use at hospitals in China, and being evaluated by clinics in Europe, and the US, primarily to detect potentially cancerous lung nodulesInfervision began work on its Covid-19 detector early in the outbreak after noticing a sudden shift in how existing customers were using its lung-scan-reading software. In mid-January, not long after the US Centers for Disease Control advised against travel to Wuhan due to the new disease, hospitals in Hubei Province began employing a previously little-used feature of Infervision’s software that looks for evidence of pneumonia, says CEO Kuan Chen. “We realized it was coming from the outbreak,” he says.

Source: https://www.wired.com/

Deciphering Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers, and one of the leading causes of death in women globally. Breast cancer is a disease where cells located in the breast grow out of control. Although a majority of breast cancers are discovered in women at the age of 50 years or older, the disease can affect anyone, including men and younger women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Last year there were 9.6 million deaths and 18.1 million new cases of breast cancer diagnosed globally according to the latest report from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) released in September 2018.

In 2019 alone, the U.S. National Cancer Institute estimates that there will be 268,600 new female breast cancer cases and 41,760 fatalities. Earlier this month, researchers based in Switzerland published in Cell their study in using applied artificial intelligence (AI) machine learning to create a comprehensive tumor and immune atlas of breast cancer ecosystems that lays the foundation for innovative precision medicine and immunotherapy.

The study was led by professor Bernd Bodenmiller, Ph.D. at the Institute of Molecular Life Sciences at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. Bodenmiller is a recipient of the 2019 Friedrich Miescher Award, Switzerland’s highest distinction for outstanding achievements in biochemistry. His team worked in collaboration with the Systems Biology Group at IBM Research in Zurich led by María Rodríguez Martínez, Ph.D. with the shared goal to produce a foundation for more targeted breast cancer treatment through precision medicine.

Source: https://www.ibm.com/