Holistic Immune Response Against Covid-19

Researchers say it’s the first real look at exactly what types of “red flags” the human body uses to enlist the help of T cells—killers the immune system sends out to destroy infected cells. Until now, COVID vaccines have focused on activating a different type of immune cell, B cells, which are responsible for creating antibodies. Developing vaccines to activate the other arm of the immune system—the T cells—could dramatically increase immunity against coronavirus, and importantly, its variants.

As reported in the journal Cell, the researchers say current vaccines might lack some important bits of viral material capable of triggering a holistic immune response in the human body.

Companies should reevaluate their vaccine designs,” says Mohsan Saeed, a virologist at Boston University’s National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) and co-corresponding author of the paper.

Saeed, an assistant professor of biochemistry at the School of Medicine, performed experiments on human cells infected with coronavirus. He isolated and identified those missing pieces of SARS-CoV-2 proteins inside one of the NEIDL’s Biosafety Level 3 (BSL-3) labs.

This was a big undertaking because many research techniques are difficult to adapt for high containment levels [such as BSL-3],” Saeed says. “The overall coronavirus research pipeline we’ve created at the NEIDL, and the support of our entire NEIDL team, has helped us along the way.”

Saeed got involved when computational geneticists Pardis Sabeti and Shira Weingarten-Gabbay contacted him. They hoped to identify fragments of SARS-CoV-2 that activate the immune system’s T cells.

The emergence of viral variants, an active area of research in my lab, is a major concern for vaccine development,” says Sabeti, a leader in the Broad Institute’s Infectious Disease and Microbiome Program. She is also a Harvard University professor of systems biology.

We swung into full action right away because my laboratory had [already] generated human cell lines that could be readily infected with SARS-CoV-2,” Saeed says. The group’s efforts were spearheaded by two members of the Saeed lab: Da-Yuan Chen, a postdoctoral associate, and Hasahn Conway, a lab technician.

Source:  https://www.futurity.org/

New Vaccine Brings Revolution In Preventing Chronic Inflammation Related To 60% Of Death

As we learn more and more about health, well-being, and all the factors that affect both, inflammation has become a major player in the conversation. Linked with symptoms ranging from bloating and acne to more serious things like depression and cancer, chronic inflammation, researchers believe, could continue to increase in prevalence. But a new vaccine offers hope for the future of preventing inflammatory diseases.

The vaccine, which is currently for animals, was developed by Institut Cochin in France. Researchers already knew about a connection between inflammation, gut health, and the protein flagellin: Flagellin essentially allows into the rest of the body, resulting in inflammation, and while antibodies exist within that intestinal barrier to help prevent leaky gut, it’s harder to keep all the bacteria contained if your microbiome is out of balance. Researchers hypothesized they could boost the flagellin antibodies within the gut, thereby keeping harmful bacteria from spreading into the body. They administered a flagellin vaccine to mice by injecting it directly into their intestinal lining, spurring the production of the flagellin-fighting antibodies. Chronic inflammation is thought to be related to 60% of deaths worldwide, due to its connection to stroke, diabetes, cancer, and more. This vaccine could be a game-changer if scientists are able to replicate the findings in a version for humans, which researcher Benoît Chassaing says they’re working on.

This vaccine strategy can be envisaged in humans, because such abnormalities of the microbiota have been observed in patients with inflammatory and metabolic diseases. With this in mind, we are currently working on a means of locally administering flagellin to the intestinal mucosa,” he says.

They’re also looking into testing the vaccine on animals that already have chronic inflammatory diseases, to see if it can be used for inflammatory treatment, as opposed to just prevention. But until such a vaccine for humans exists, there are lots of ways to combat inflammation naturally. If you’re still looking for more information, check out the Ultimate Guide to Inflammation class.. When inflammation was induced, the unvaccinated mice became obese, and the vaccinated mice did not. Immunization quelled intestinal inflammation by lowering levels of the flagellin-expressing bacteria in their microbiota, intestines, and intestinal lining.

Source: https://www.mindbodygreen.com/