How to Prevent Tooth Loss

Research headed by scientists at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) has shown how blocking the function of the blood clotting protein, fibrin, prevents bone loss from periodontal (gum) disease in mice. Drawing on animal and human data, the study—headed by NIDCR investigators Niki Moutsopoulos, DDS, PhD, and Thomas Bugge, PhD, found that build-up of fibrin triggers an overactive immune response that damages the gums and underlying bone. The results suggest that suppressing abnormal fibrin activity could hold promise for preventing or treating periodontal disease, as well as other inflammatory disorders—including arthritis and multiple sclerosis—that are marked by fibrin buildup.

Severe periodontal disease can lead to tooth loss and remains a barrier to productivity and quality of life for far too many Americans, especially those lacking adequate access to dental care,” said NIDCR director Rena D’Souza, DDS, PhD. “By providing the most comprehensive picture yet of the underlying mechanisms of periodontal disease, this study brings us closer to more effective methods for prevention and treatment.”

Periodontal disease is a bacterial infection of the tissues supporting the teeth. The condition affects nearly half of people in the United States who are over the age 30, and 70% of those who are 65 years and older. In its early stages, periodontal disease causes redness and swelling (inflammation) of the gums. In advanced stages, called periodontitis, the underlying bone becomes damaged, leading to tooth loss. While scientists have known that periodontitis is driven in part by an exaggerated immune cell response, until now, it was unclear what triggered the response, and how it caused tissue and bone damage.

Moutsopoulos, Bugge, and colleagues reported their findings in Science, in a paper titled, “Fibrin is a critical regulator of neutrophil effector function at the oral mucosal barrier.”

 

Source: https://www.genengnews.com/

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