Blocking Enzymes Reverse Alzheimer’s Memory Loss

Inhibiting certain enzymes involved in abnormal gene transcription may offer a way to restore memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s disease, a new study in mice suggests.

The findings could pave the way toward new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

“By treating AD mouse models with a compound to inhibit these enzymes, we were able to normalize gene expression, restore neuronal function, and ameliorate cognitive impairment,” says senior author Zhen Yan, a professor in the department of physiology and biophysics in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo.

Alzheimer’s disease alters the expression of genes in the prefrontal cortex, a key region of the brain controlling cognitive processes and executive functions.

When they focused on gene changes caused by epigenetic processes (those not related to changes in DNA sequences) such as aging, the researchers could reverse elevated levels of harmful genes that cause memory deficits in AD.

The current research extends the work the team reported in 2019 in the journal Brain, in which they reversed the loss or downregulation of genes beneficial to cognitive function in AD.

In the new paper in Science Advances, the team reports they reversed the upregulation of genes involved in impairing cognitive function.

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