Tag Archives: algorithms

Ai-Da The Artist Robot

A British arts engineering company says it has created the world’s first AI robot capable of drawing people who pose for it. The humanoid called Ai-Da can sketch subjects using a microchip in her eye and a pencil in her robotic hand – coordinated by AI processes and algorithmsAi-Da‘s ability as a life-like robot to draw and paint ultra-realistic portraits from sight has never been achieved before, according to the designers in Cornwall. It is the brainchild of art impresario and galleries Aidan Meller.

Named after Ada Lovelace , the first female computer programmer in the world, Ai-Da the robot has been designed and built by Cornish robotics company Engineered Arts who make robots for communication and entertainment.

In April 2018, Engineered Arts created an ultra-realistic robot to promote the Westworld TV show.

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Pioneering a new AI art movement, we are excited to present Ai-Da, the first professional humanoid artist, who creates her own art, as well as being a performance artist. “As an AI robot, her artwork uses AI processes and algorithms. “The work engages us to think about AI and technological uses and abuses in the world today.” explains Aidan Meller.

Professors and post-Phd students at Oxford University and Goldsmiths are providing Ai-Da with the programming and creative design for her art work. While students at Leeds University are custom designing and programming a bionic arm to create her art work.

Ai-Da has a “RoboThespian” body , featuring an expressive range of movements and she has the ability to talk and respond to questions. The robot also has a “Mesmer” head, featuring realistic silicone skin, 3D printed teeth and gums, integrated eye cameras, as well as hair.

Source: http://fortune.com/
AND
https://www.mirror.co.uk/

Facial Recognition And AI Identify 90% Of Rare Genetic Disorders

A facial recognition scan could become part of a standard medical checkup in the not-too-distant future. Researchers have shown how algorithms can help identify facial characteristics linked to genetic disorders, potentially speeding up clinical diagnoses.

In a study published this month in the journal Nature Medicine, US company FDNA published new tests of their software, DeepGestalt. Just like regular facial recognition software, the company trained their algorithms by analyzing a dataset of faces. FDNA collected more than 17,000 images covering 200 different syndromes using a smartphone app it developed named Face2Gene.

Rare genetic disorders are collectively common, affecting 8 percent of the population

In two first tests, DeepGestalt was used to look for specific disorders: Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Angelman syndrome. Both of these are complex conditions that affect intellectual development and mobility. They also have distinct facial traits, like arched eyebrows that meet in the middle for Cornelia de Lange syndrome, and unusually fair skin and hair for Angelman syndrome.

When tasked with distinguishing between pictures of patients with one syndrome or another, random syndrome, DeepGestalt was more than 90 percent accurate, beating expert clinicians, who were around 70 percent accurate on similar tests. When tested on 502 images showing individuals with 92 different syndromes, DeepGestalt identified the target condition in its guess of 10 possible diagnoses more than 90 percent of the time.

Source: https://www.theverge.com

Teaching a car how to drive itself in 20 minutes

Researchers from Wayve, a company founded by a team from the Cambridge University engineering department, have developed a neural network sophisticated enough to learn how to drive a car in 15 to 20 minutes using nothing but a computer and a single camera. The company showed off its robust deep learning methods last week in a company blog post showcasing the no-frills approach to driverless car development. Where companies like Waymo and Uber are relying on a variety of sensors and custom-built hardware, Wayve is creating the world’s first autonomous vehicles based entirely on reinforcement learning.

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The AI powering Wayve’s self-driving system is remarkable for its simplicity. It’s a four layer convolutional neural network (learn about neural networks here) that performs all of its processing on a GPU inside the car. It doesn’t require any cloud connectivity or use pre-loaded mapsWayve’s vehicles are early-stage level five autonomous. There’s a lot of work to be done before Wayve’s AI can drive any car under any circumstances. But the idea that driverless cars will require tens of thousands of dollars worth of extraneous hardware is taking a serious blow in the wake of the company’s amazing deep learning techniques. According to Wayve, these algorithms are only going to get smarter.

Source: https://wayve.ai/
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https://thenextweb.com/